Through the Lens: The U.S. Poker Open Begins

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The U.S. Poker Open is back, baby! Yesterday kicked off the first of 10 consecutive days of poker action live from the PokerGo Studio. The opening $10,000 NLH event drew a total of 90 entries, cruising right by last years total of 68 entries. Here’s a look at a few of my favorite images from Day 1, and be sure to tune into the live-streamed final table later today at 5pm EST.

The PokerGo studio was packed today with a turnout of 90 players in Event 1. This number far succeeds the 68 entries of this event last year, with today’s winners taking home $216,000.
Fresh off his big score down under, Bryn Kenney wasted no time hopping in Event 1. Kenney is coming off of a $914,000 payday after taking down the Aussie Millions Main Event just two weeks ago. The score boosts Kenney to over $26,000,000 in lifetime earnings, only further cementing his legacy amongst tournament grinders. With momentum fully swinging in his direction, Kenney will without a doubt be a player to watch through the USPO. 
Joseph Cheong is your event 1 chip leader heading into today’s final table. Cheong ended play when he picked up aces against the queens of Jerry Robinson to eliminate him, and bring the field down to 6.
This year all eyes will be on the 2018 U.S. Poker Open Champ Stephen Chidwick. Granted Chidwick is a serious threat in any tournament, he seems to always do well here at the Aria. Why else would I have drafted him #1 overall in the Poker Central Fantasy Draft! He comes into the final table 3rd in chips. 
Alex Foxen closed out 2018 with a career best score of $2,160,000 after finishing 2nd in the $300,000 Poker Masters. Foxen’s score completed his quest to become the #1 ranked player, capping off a remarkable year. Earlier this week Remko caught up with Foxen to talk about his motives for 2019, and the idea of being the first ever to rank #1 in back to back years

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